Elaine on human trafficking

Here is a rough video I’ve made on the issue of human trafficking. As I upload the video, this comes with news of two successful trafficking prosecutions in Scotland (see http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-15150364). If you would like to read more on the state of trafficking globally, the Trafficking in Persons 2011 report is a good place to … Continue reading

The Justice Conference Feb 2012

“Justice is a garment, a billion threads, interwoven, interlocked, knit together with strength and integrity. Pull one thread from the fabric and the garment begins to fray. Pull ten million threads and justice unravels into injustice. The work of justice is to mend the holes injustice inflicts upon the garment. It is a brave, challenging, … Continue reading

Hip hop and counter-trafficking

Don’t know how you can make a difference to stop human trafficking? Jason Chu is an example of starting where you are at and using what skills you have to make a difference. Jason is fundraising money to support the Red Thread Movement and its work against trafficking…and he’s using hip hop to do so! … Continue reading

How to get super fat- a Chinese love story with food

Its been a few days in Beijing and I am not quite sure if what I am eating is real food. Just in case you havent heard, the recent food cases in China include: 1. Watermelons injected with some food hormone until they burst from ‘overgrowing’                   … Continue reading

Youth identity in UN and World Bank policies

Here is the latest article from one of my pieces of research over the last year. It examines how youth are often portrayed as trouble makers or victims. In conflict situations it gets a bit more complicated, with many development agencies preferring images of children dying in order to secure more donations, or at the … Continue reading

Modern day slavery and its forgotten victims

When I think of slavery, for some reason I think about William Wilberforce, the American Civil War and Rosa Parks.  And then the assumption that follows is that slavery is now well and truly abolished. Unfortunately, I couldn’t be more wrong. Human trafficking is an approximately USD 60 billion dollar (in profits) industry, with an … Continue reading

How long will the Thai middle class support Ying luck’s populist policies?

Sorry, I don’t know the answer. But something that continually amazes me is how people outside Thailand seem fixated on the fact that Thailand has a female Prime Minister. I didnt even think about it and was surprised when someone asked me what I thought about her. To be honest, I havent thought much about … Continue reading

Flash mob hakas- New Zealand going Rugby wild!

Here is a really great insight into the Kiwi mentality and rugby craze storming through New Zealand right now. The Rugby World Cup begins end of this week with New Zealand’s first game and so it is fitting that the atmosphere is piping hot with excitement right now. To get a sense of this excitement, … Continue reading

A floating village on Tonle Sap lake, Cambodia

On 11 August 2011, a group of Rotary Peace Fellows from Chulalongkorn University visited Tonle Sap lake in Cambodia. Our purpose was to learn more about the post-conflict reconstruction issues in Cambodia. A big issue for Cambodia is that the fisheries industry is one of the biggest in the domestic economy and thus our visit … Continue reading

Where children sleep

Check this out: http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/08/04/where-children-sleep/ “As a child, that’s your little space within the house,” Mr. Mollison said. Kaya, 4, lives with her parents in a small Tokyo apartment. James Mollison Kaya’s bedroom. Mr. Mollison’s new book, “Where Children Sleep,” had its origins in a project undertaken for a children’s charity several years ago. As he … Continue reading

The killing fields of Cambodia- short video

This a rough video of my visit to the Choeung Ek killing fields. 17 Rotary World Peace Fellows, as part of their 3 month fellowship with the Peace Centre at Chulalongkorn University, visited Cambodia this August 2011 to learn more about the post-conflict reconstruction work taking place there. As part of our field trip, we … Continue reading

Reflecting on the Cambodian psyche

Cambodia is a fascinating but broken country. At its peak, Angkor was a thriving city with a million inhabitants and 300 temples just within its 400km2 area, with the reach of the Khmer empire extending to Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam, Thailand and Malaysia. The Khmer empire was undoubtedly a powerful nation. The walls of Bayon temple … Continue reading

The Killing fields of Cambodia- Choeung Ek, Phnom Penh

WARNING: SOME PEOPLE MAY FIND THE BELOW PHOTOS AND DESCRIPTIONS TO BE DISTURBING. On 7 August 2011, we headed to the killing fields of Choeung Ek which is just30 minutes outside the centre of Phnom Penh. Prior to the rise of the Khmer Rouge, Choeung Ek was actually a Chinese cemetery which became the Khmer … Continue reading

Tuol Sleng S-21 Torture camp, Cambodia

7 August 2011 I visited the killing fields of Cheoung Ek, just outside Phnom Penh. It was sobering to see the shelves of skulls and learn how the excavation of more bodies have ceased as there were insufficient number of genocidal monuments to house the bones of those killed during the Khmer Rouge‘s regime during … Continue reading